Tuesday, August 20, 2019

Review: FM (1978)


If ever a movie was tailor-made for Cereal At Midnight, it's 1978's FM. The film chronicles the inner workings of an FM rock radio station in the late seventies and the struggle to maintain freedom and autonomy in an ever-increasing corporate radio landscape. The personalities and on-air antics are taken from actual radio history, inspired predominantly by the men and women who ran the airwaves of San Francisco's KMPX station in the late sixties, as well as Los Angeles' KMET. These pioneers blazed remarkable trails across pop culture when the FM format was still largely unregulated and free from the commercial aspects that had overtaken AM radio. FM is about integrity, rock and roll music and attitude, and rebellion against any establishment that doesn't value those things. The film is also packed wall-to-wall with vinyl tracks, and maintains a delightful analog spirit. There's life between the grooves.